The Writer’s Dictionary

a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w

How many of us can remember exactly what a past participle is? Or how about the differences between restrictive and nonrestrictive clauses?

I know it can be difficult to remember some of these concepts and terms if you haven’t taken a formal writing class in a while, so, to help us all remember, I have compiled some of the most frequently used grammar words and phrases here in The Writer’s Dictionary.

But, this isn’t just an ordinary dictionary of grammatical terms and literary concepts. The Writer’s Dictionary is written in plain everyday language so that everyone from the beginner to the experienced writer can understand it. We also incorporate examples in as many places as possible so the reader can visualize the concepts being discussed.

The Writer’s Dictionary is meant to be not only a refresher tool to help us remember some of the terms we may have forgotten but also a learning tool where we can deepen our understanding of language and become betters writers.

If there are any terms that you would like to see added to The Writer’s Dictionary, feel free to email me with a suggestion at Jordan@writingexplained.org!

(A)

Absolute Possessive Pronoun

Abstract Noun

Accusative Case

Acrostic Poem

Action Verb

Active Voice

Actor

Adjective

Adjective Clause

Adverb

Affix

Agent Noun

Allegory

Alliteration

Allusion

Anagram

Analogy

Anaphora

Antecedent

Antithesis

Appositive / Appositive Phrase

Apostrophe (Punctuation Mark)

Auxiliary Verb

(B)

(C)

Cardinal Numbers

Clause

Closed-Ended Question

Collective Noun

Colon

Comma Splice

Common Noun

Complete Subject

Compound Adjective

Compound Predicate

Compound Subject

Concrete Noun

Conditional Sentence

Conjugation

Conjunction

Consonant

Copular Verb

Correlative Conjunction

Count Noun

Countable Noun

(D)

Dangling Modifier

Dangling Participle

Dative Case

Definite Articles

Demonstrative Adjective

Demonstrative Pronoun

Dependent Clause

Determiner

Dialect

Dialogue (Literary)

Direct Object

Double Entendre

Double Negative

Dramatic Irony

(E)

Emotive Language

Essential Clause

Ethos

Euphemism

Exclamation Point

Exclamation Sentence

Exclamatory Sentence

(F)

First Person

Foil

Foreshadowing

Future Perfect Progressive Tense

Future Perfect Tense

Future Progressive Tense

Future Tense

(G)

Genitive Case

Gerund

Gerund Phrase

Grammar

(H)

Helping Verbs

Homily

Homonym

Homophone

Hyperbole

(I)

Idiom

Indefinite Adjective

Indefinite Articles

Indefinite Pronoun

Independent Clause

Indirect Object

Infinitive Phrase

Inflection

Interjection

Interrogative Sentence

Intransitive Verb

(J)

Juxtaposition

(K)

(L)

Limerick

Linking Verb

Litotes

Logos

Lowercase Letters

(M)

Main Clause

Main Verb

Metaphor

Misplaced Modifier

Modal Verb

Modifier

Mood (Grammatical)

Mood (Literary)

Motif

(N)

Narrator

Nominative Case

Non-count Noun

Nonessential Clause

Nonrestrictive Clause

Noun

Noun Clause

(O)

Object

Objective Case

Object Complement

Object / Objective Pronoun

Onomatopoeia

Open-Ended Question

Ordinal Numbers

Oxymoron

(P)

Paradox

Paragraph

Parallel Structure

Parallelism

Participle

Passive Voice

Past Participle

Past Perfect Progressive Tense

Past Perfect Tense

Past Progressive Tense

Past Tense

Perfect Tense

Personal Pronoun

Personification

Phrasal verb

Phrase

Plot

Plural Form

Plural Noun

Possessive

Possessive Adjective

Possessive Pronoun

Predicate

Predicate Adjective

Predicate Nominative

Predicate Noun

Prefix

Preposition

Present Perfect Tense

Present Perfect Progressive Tense

Present Progressive Tense

Present Tense

Progressive Tense

Pronoun

Proper Adjective

Proper Noun

(Q)

(R)

Red Herring

Relative Clause

Relative Pronoun

Restrictive Clause

Rising Action

Run-on Sentence

(S)

Satire

Second Person

Semicolon

Sentence Fragment

Sentence Structure

Simile

Simple Aspect

Simple Predicate

Simple Subject

Simple Tense

Singular Form

Singular Noun

Split Infinitive

Squinting Modifier

Strong Verb

Subject Complement

Subject / Subjective Pronoun

Subject-verb Agreement

Subordinate Clause

Suffix

Syllable

Symbolism

Synecdoche

Syntax

(T)

Tense

Third Person

Tone

Transitive verb

(U)

Uncountable Noun

Uppercase Letters

(V)

Verb

Vocative Comma

Vowel

(W)

Weak Verb

https://writingexplained.org/affect-vs-effect

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