I.e. and E.g.

The Chicago Style Manual recognizes i.e. as meaning “that is” and e.g. as meaning “for example.”

Chicago Style has two basic requirements when writing these two abbreviations in sentences. First, it requires that these two abbreviations be placed into parenthesis or notes within your sentences. For example,

  • Only certain apples are tasty (e.g., fugi apples).

Also, Chicago Style requires there to be a comma after the use of the abbreviations. For example,

  • Wrong: We should do something about all of this snow (i.e. shovel our driveway).
  • Correct: We should do something about all of this snow (i.e., shovel our driveway).

For a more full discussion on the differences between i.e. and e.g., check out our full post on the subject.

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