What Does Chock Full of Something Mean?

Chock Full of Something Meaning

Definition: To be very full of something.

The idiom chock full of something means that something is filled to its limit. In an idiomatic context, this phrase is used to illustrate that there is an abundance of something.

This phrase may or may not be hyphenated. The meaning of the phrase remains the same either way.

Origin of Chock Full of Something

The exact etymology of this idiom is unclear, although there are a few theories about its origin. It may have derived from the 15th century Middle English phrase chokkeful, which translates to mean crammed full.

Alternatively, it may have come from the 13th-century Old French term choquier, which means to crash.

Ways to Use Chock Full of Something

 Meaning of chock full of somethingThis idiom is used to indicate that something is extremely full. Full can take on a literal or figurative connotation in this sense.

For example, if the trash can in your office is overflowing with trash, a coworker might say to you, “Your trash can is chock full of garbage; why don’t you empty it?” This is an example of something being literally full.

In more figurative cases, this phrase refers to things which contain an abundance of something.

For example, a nutritionist might say vegetables are chock full of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. This means there is an abundance of these substances in the vegetables; it does not mean that these substances are literally overflowing.

This idiom can be used in any context in which there is an abundance of something. The abundance may or may not be of a physical item. For example, someone may be chock full of painful emotions after they receive upsetting news.

Examples of Chock Full of Something

Define chock full of somethingThe example conversation between two friends illustrates the correct use of this idiom as it is used in modern English.

Whitney: You really shouldn’t eat that candy bar.

Jody: Why not?

Whitney: It’s chock full of empty calories.

Here is another example of someone describing his favorite book.

Steve: Why do you like this book so much?

Greg: It’s a fascinating read. It’s chock full of information and data that makes you think.

Steve: Sounds pretty interesting. Is it long?

Greg: Not too long. It’s 250 pages.

More Examples

  • 2016 was a year chock full of athletic insanity. – NY Post
  • Except for one little detail, the final chapter of Elfrieda Knaak’s life reads like an Agatha Christie mystery novel. It was chock full of ambiguity. – Chicago Tribune

Summary

The English idiom chock full of something means that something is extremely full. In modern English, this phrase is used to illustrate an abundance of something.